House Plan FAQ

Do you have questions about house plans for a home? If you are planning to buy plans or build a home, this page answers the most common home planning questions. Contact Wyatt House Plans if you need more info.

COST
How much will this house cost?
Will every house have the same per sq. ft. cost?
Is building cost figured by the square foot?
How much should I figure per sq. ft.?
How much does it cost to modify the plans?

COPYRIGHT
What is this copyright stuff all about?
Are Wyatt house plans copyrighted?
Can I use the plans more than once?

CUSTOM HOME DESIGN
Can you draw plans to remodel our home?
Do you travel and design homes for people out of town?
We can’t find the house we like what do we do?

ENERGY EFFICIENCY
What can we do to have low heating and cooling bills?
Is this house plan energy efficient?

EXTRA COPY OF PLANS
How many sets of plans do I need?
Who will need a set of plans?
Can we make our own copies?
What is a reproducible?
What are the reproducible formats?
Our plans are in bad shape, can we get more?
Can I save money by making my own copies?
Can I use the plans more than once?

GETTING STARTED
We want a new house. What do we do first?
Can I drive by the house to see it in person?
We can’t find the house we like what do we do?

HOME REMODELING
Do you travel and design homes for people out of town?
Can you draw remodel plans for our existing house?

PLAN MODIFICATIONS
How much does it cost to modify the plans?
Can I change the house and / or plans?
We can’t find the house we like what do we do?
Can I have the house flipped so the garage is on the opposite side?

SQUARE FOOTAGE
How is square footage figured?
How is finished square feet defined?
What qualifies as being finished square footage?
What is included when figuring square footage?

SQUARE FOOTAGE (Cont.)
What is NOT included in sq. ft. calculations?
How is “Above-grade” and “Below-grade” defined?
How is square footage listed?
Does the square footage include unfinished areas and heated areas?
What should not be included in the square footage?
Is building cost figured by the square foot?
How much should I figure per sq. ft.?
Will every house have the same per sq. ft. cost?

PLANS INCLUDE
What is included in a set of plans?
Is a materials list available?
Do the plans include mechanical details?
Do the plans show framing dimensions or finished dimensions?

PLANS OPTIONS AND UPGRADES
What is the difference between “Mirror” reverse and “Right Reading” reverse?
Do you offer right-reading reversed plans?
Can I have the house flipped so the garage is on the opposite side?

RETURN POLICY AND WARRANTEE
What is your return policy?
What sort of warrantee comes with the plans?

SAVING MONEY
Can we purchase fewer sets of plans to save money?
Do you offer advertising materials to help market and sell the house?
Can I save money by making my own copies?
Can I use the plans more than once?
What can we do to have low heating and cooling bills?

SELECTING A BUILDER
The contract protects the builder, will it protect us?
Should I be my own general contractor?

SPEC HOMES
Do you offer advertising materials to help market and sell the house?
We’d like to build a the home on speculation – any advice?

STRUCTURAL
What kind of foundation does the plan have?
What is the exterior wall thickness? Is a materials list available?

UNDERSTANDING BLUEPRINTS
What is the difference between “Mirror” reverse and “Right Reading” reverse?
Do you offer right-reading reversed plans?
What is a reproducible vellum / original?
Can I drive by the house to see it in person?
What is your best plan and why?
Do the plans show framing dimensions or finished dimensions?
Is there a difference between framing and finished dimensions?


How is square footage figured?

With so many facets to this topic it is difficult to compress into a short answer. Fortunately, the long answer is thorough.

People often wonder if the square footage only includes climate controlled areas or whether it should also include the garage, patio, or screen porch. Although all these spaces have “square footage,” they should not be added together. These areas should be listed separately in finished, and unfinished, categories.

The Wyatt Drafting & Design, Inc. method for measuring and listing square footage is an adaptation of the American National Standards Institute (ASNI) method, see ANSI Z765-2003. This is for calculating square footage in single family dwellings only. It is not used for apartments or multiple dwellings.

Note: Although there is a standard to figuring square footage, two people can still arrive at different figures because some people treat terms like “heated space” and “square footage” the same – although they mean different things.

The focus of this topic is specifically on heated space not the larger square footage of the entire building.

How is finished square feet defined?

FINISHED AREA / SQUARE FOOTAGE (sometimes referred to as “heated living areas” or “heated square footage”) is an enclosed area in a home suitable for year-round use that is intended for human occupancy and has the following qualifications:

What qualifies as being finished square footage?

  1. The area is heated by a conventional, permanent heating system or systems (forced air, radiant, solar, etc.) that are permanently installed in the dwelling which generates heat sufficient to make the space suitable for year-round occupancy.
  2. The area is enclosed and suitable for year-round use, embodying walls, floors, and ceilings of materials generally accepted for interior construction (e.g., painted drywall/sheet rock or paneled walls, carpeted or hardwood flooring, etc.)
  3. The ceiling height is not less than 7-feet high (except under beams, ducts, etc. where the height must be at least 6 feet 4 inches). In rooms with sloped ceilings (e.g. finished attics, bonus rooms, etc.) at least half the square footage area must have a ceiling height no less than 7-foot. No portion of the finished area which is less than 5 feet high is considered in the finished square footage and for that to be included at all, a minimum of one half of the finished area of the room must not have ceilings less than 7-foot high. Also, the room must be directly accessible from another finished living area (though a door or by a heated hallway or stairway.)

What is included when figuring square footage?

  • Areas included in sq. ft. calculations meet the qualifications listed above and more specifically:
  • Closets are included with their respective areas. Bedroom closets are counted as finished living space, closets in a garage are part of the garage, which, being unsuitable for year-round occupancy, are not counted.
  • Bay windows are included when they have a floor, a ceiling height of at least seven feet, and meet the other criteria for living area. The mechanical room (containing items like a furnace, water heater, or other similar items) if it is located in a small closet within the living area, it is included in the total square footage. It is included in the living area even if it does not meet other living area criteria.
  • Exterior walls are included and are measured to the exterior, finished surface of the wall. A good way to remember this is the homeowner “buys the walls too.” However, Wyatt D & D does not include brick veneer because it is often omitted to save cost or used on different walls.
  • Chimneys are included when the base is inside the living area. If the chimney base is outside the living area but the hearth is in the living area, then the hearth in the living area is included but not the chimney base.
  • Finished areas above garages (e.g. bonus rooms) are included in the finished square footage if they are connected to the house by continuous finished areas such as hallways or staircases from other finished areas. If accessed through any unfinished space it is not considered finished square footage.
  • Areas above garages (e.g. bonus rooms) that meet living area criteria are considered in the square footage calculation only after this area is finished and heated. Until such time this area is listed separately.
  • Stairs are included on the level they sit on.
  • When an area that is not part of the living area (e.g. garage) shares a common wall with the living area, the measurements for the living area will include the thickness of the common wall, and the measurements for the other areas will not.

What is NOT included in sq. ft. calculations?

  • Unfinished areas are not included in the calculations of finished square footage.
  • Areas of a room with a ceiling height less than 5 feet are not included.
  • Porches, balconies, decks, garages, and similar areas that are not enclosed or suitable for year-round use are not included as part of the finished / heated square footage. However, these areas are figured and listed separately.
  • Although garages may be finished and also heated, garage square footage is not intended for living space. Therefore, they are listed separately.
  • Wall protrusions like chimneys and bay windows are not counted in square footage calculations unless the protrusions have a floor on the same level and meet ceiling height requirements.
  • Volume “spaces” (e.g. the upper part of two-story foyers, vaulted ceilings, and cathedral ceiling areas) are not counted with square footage. The high space that opens to the ceiling of the next higher level is part of the lower room only and the space is subtracted from the square footage of the upper floor. Ceiling heights may be noted elsewhere but it is not part of the square footage calculations. A good way to remember this is, “If you can walk on it, count it, if not, don’t”.
  • A stairwell, or open area above a stair, like that of a cathedral ceiling, is not counted as finished square footage. It is considered open volume. The “hole”, or opening, for the stairway is subtracted from the square footage—“air space” that cannot be walked on is not included.
  • For below-grade areas, assuming that a concrete foundation is already set in place to support the main floor, the concrete foundation is not included with the area of the finished below-grade room(s). Therefore, finished basement rooms are calculated to the inside of the concrete foundation. In areas with a stick framed walkout basement wall, the measurement is taken to the exterior surface of the wall. (see “belowgrade” areas)

How is “Above-grade” and “Below-grade” defined?

  • Any level with living area accessible by interior stairs and has earth adjacent to any exterior wall on that level is considered “below-grade.” If earth is adjacent to any portion of a wall, the entire level is considered “below-grade.” Levels that are “at” or “on grade” are considered “abovegrade.” Above-grade and below-grade areas are listed separately. (above-grade is entirely above ground level; below-grade is wholly or partially below ground level.)
  • The total above-grade finished area of a house is the sum of finished areas on levels that are entirely above-grade. The total below-grade finished square footage is the sum of finished areas on levels that are wholly or partly below-grade.

How is square footage listed?

  • Square footage is reported to the nearest whole square foot
  • Square footage for above-grade and below-grade finished areas is listed separately.
  • Square footage for all areas that contribute to the value of the dwelling is listed, although these areas do NOT meet the criteria for finished heated living space like those of unfinished basements, unfinished attics (with permanent stairs), porches, patios, balconies, garages, decks, unfinished bonus rooms, shops, and carports. The square footage is computed and listed separately with finished and unfinished areas indicated. Does the square footage include unfinished areas and heated areas? The figures shown on the website only represent finished/ climate-controlled areas suitable for year-round use that is intended for human occupancy.

What should not be included in the square footage?

  1. Don’t use the room sizes shown on the website. Room dimensions represent the floor area within a given room. Computing the width and length of each room, then adding up the total of each room will NOT result in the total square footage. That would overlook stairwells, closets, and space within the walls. Yes, that’s right, you do include wall thickness when figuring square footage. There is a simple way to remember this; you have to pay for the walls too – they are part of the house.
  2. Don’t count high ceilings. Space above a room, such as a cathedral ceiling or two story high room, is not considered square footage. Sorry, it’s just a high ceiling. It is “heated space” and nothing more. That space would be computed as a “cubic” foot calculation. Don’t confuse it with square footage.
  3. Don’t count low ceilings. Crawlspaces, attics, or other rooms with ceilings less than five foot high are not considered finished living space (even if they are finished).
  4. Don’t include bay windows without a floor. Bay windows are not included in the square footage unless a floor extends into the bay.
  5. Don’t count seasonal rooms. Any room that cannot be used yearround is not included in the finished square footage.

NOTE: Square footage calculations may differ as per calculation practice and formula used. Finished room sizes may vary slightly from plans. If the room sizes shown on the website are added together they will not equal the total sq. ft. The stated room sizes do not include wall thicknesses. The figures shown on the Wyatt House Plans website represent only finished heated/ conditioned living space. A complete sq. ft. breakdown is listed on the actual house plans.

How much will this house cost?

Due to various labor and building costs (which differ from one region to the next) as well as the type of finish materials you select for your home, it is impossible for us to estimate the cost of your construction project.

Back to the Question List:

Is building cost figured by the square foot?

Figuring cost based on square footage is misleading. A builder might have an “average” sq. ft. cost but don’t forget, average means that expensive must be blended with cheap to determine an average. Expecting one common price is like expecting all meat at the supermarket to cost the same. Besides, who’s to say your house is average? Many things affect cost, and much of the cost is shaped by the finishes you select. The lumber in a home is a small part of the total. The things you touch and see every day are a very big part of the cost. Those very materials that give your home its personality and character impact the cost in a most significant way.

Related topics:
How much should I figure per sq. ft.?
Will every house have the same sq. ft. build cost?
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How much should I figure per sq. ft.? There aren’t any exact figures for figuring costs by the square foot. Costs are dependent on the materials you choose for your home.

Related topics:
Is building cost figured by the square foot?
Will every house have the same sq. ft. build cost?
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Will every house have the same per sq. ft. cost? No. It’s very possible for two seemingly identical floor plans – with the same square footage – to have different per square foot costs. For example, house “A” might have an all brick exterior, marble floors, and a cathedral ceiling. House “B” has vinyl siding, carpeting throughout, and eight-foot high, flat ceilings. Between the two, house “A” will cost more. While the square footage of the houses remained the same, the cost per square foot would vary.

Related topics:
Is building cost figured by the square foot?
How much should I figure per sq. ft.?
Back to the Question List:

How many sets of plans do I need? Every person involved in the construction of a home may need one or more sets of plans. It is possible that you will use fifteen (15) sets of plans.

Related topics: Who needs a set of plans?
Who will need a set of plans?

  1. Homeowner
  2. General contractor
  3. Excavator
  4. Foundation / concrete specialist
  5. Electrician
  6. Plumber
  7. Heating / air conditioning contractor
  8. Building department
  9. Mortgage holder / bank
  10. Lumber yard
  11. Interior decorator
  12. Lighting consultant
  13. Landscaper
  14. Miscellaneous estimates
  15. Subdivision review committee

Use your set of plans, or buy an extra set, to mark the locations of certain underground items like; your sewer line, water supply, telephone, septic tank and so on. (additional sets $180 ea. when placed with original order)

Can we make our own copies? You may only copy versions intended for and licensed for reproduction. Our reproducible plans are available in three different formats:

  1. PDF version of the plans (sent via Email) (you may print all you need)
  2. reproducible INK vellum (make all the copies you need)
  3. Easy-Change PENCIL vellum (make all changes and copies you need) Making copies of the standard 15 set plan package is not permitted. They are red-ink stamped and copyright protected. If the 15 sets of plans are not sufficient you may purchase additional sets of plans ($180 each when placed with original order) or:

What is a Reproducible? A reproducible is a set of plans available in one of three different formats, (i) PDF, (ii) INK vellum*, or (iii) PENCIL vellum*. A license to make as many copies as you need is included with the purchase of these formats.

* “Vellum” is a special, semi-transparent paper. What are the reproducible formats? We offer three different reproducible formats, (i) PDF, (ii) INK vellum*, or (iii) PENCIL vellum*. A license to make as many copies as you need is included with the purchase of these formats. * “Vellum” is a special, semi-transparent paper.

What is this copyright stuff all about?

Copyright protects the intellectual property of the person, or company, that created, or owns, a design. Anyone who intends to use the property must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Permission is made through a license. Purchasing a license does not transfer any copyright or ownership.

Wyatt house plan licenses may not be transferred, gifted, or sold to a third party unless permitted in writing by Wyatt, at the sole discretion of Wyatt. Purchasing multiple copies of house plans (licenses), does not enlarge the rights of the purchaser or provide any additional entitlements. Legal action can be taken against anyone who copies a design without authorization, or make derivative works thereof. TO AVOID COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT (A FEDERAL OFFENSE) ALWAYS PURCHASE THE PLAN DO NOT REPRODUCE OR COPY ANY HOUSE PLAN IN ANY WAY, INCLUDING TRACING OR REDRAWING UNLESS A REPRODUCIBLE SET OF PLANS/ LICENSE HAS BEEN PURCHASED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Contrary to popular belief, changing a design by making a few, or several changes, is NOT a way around copyright. Changes do not constitute a new creation. Changes are typically viewed as a derivative (a copy) of the original work. If a design is completely redrawn (that would be the first violation of copyright) with every room made larger, it would still be the same design and violate copyright. If the plan or exterior of any derivative work is strikingly similar to the original there may be cause for action. In cases where changes are inevitable, plans must be purchased. Those who purchase a Wyatt license are granted permission to alter the design without risk of violating copyright law.

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Are Wyatt house plans copyrighted?

Yes. A copyright has been registered for all Wyatt house plans at the Library of Congress, Washington D. C. Wyatt Drafting & Design, Inc. is the owner of the house plans and has exclusive rights, including copyright, in and to the design as represented in the structure, plans, and drawings and reserves the right to collect statutory damages from the infringement or unauthorized use of designs that may be as high as $100,000 for each and every infringement. Persons liable for infringement are also required to pay legal fees which can exceed the amount of damages. In addition to the house plans, the illustrations, photographs, and all parts of this website and related webpages, including the primary domain website plus related and connected domain names and websites, and all textural content are copyrighted by and remain the exclusive property of Wyatt Drafting & Design, Inc.

What is the difference between “Mirror” reverse and “Right Reading” reverse? Although we only offer “Right-Reading” reversed plans, some companies offer “Mirror” reverse plans where all text and numbers are backwards.

Do you offer right-reading reversed plans? Yes. We only offer “Right-Reading” reversed plans. The process may delay some orders.

Can we purchase fewer sets of plans to save money? Our minimum order is for 15 sets of plans. We found that most orders for less than 15 sets resulted in callbacks for more plans so we upgraded our print systems to better handle and process larger orders. This is good news and less hassle for you. It is comforting to knowing you’ve got what you need from the start, rather than wait for additional sets to arrive later.

Do you offer advertising materials to help market and sell the house?

Yes we do. If you plan to sell the home be sure to inquire about our professional advertising materials to help. Our plans are in bad shape, can we get more? Yes. Plans get tattered and torn during the construction process. Since you already purchased the plans (proof of purchase may be required) we will happily issue another 15 sets of plans. A modest re-use fee applies to cover the costs that arise from the production of new plans. Also, because we frequently update and add information to our plans, the re-issued sets will include any updates.

What kind of foundation does the plan have?

Most of our designs are planned on a full basement. A few are shown on a slab or crawlspace. Generally, your builder can make any necessary adjustments. What is the exterior wall thickness? For energy efficiency and stability, unless noted otherwise, Wyatt house plans are designed with 2 x 6 exterior walls.

We’d like to build a the home on speculation – any advice?

Inquire about our advertising materials to help you promote the home and hopefully sell it before you ever finish the home! If you would like to use the plans multiple times, and make multiple copies, consider purchasing our reproducible vellums, or electronic PDF, or Easy- Change pencil drawings. With these products you can make as many copies as you need – when you need them.

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Can I save money making my own copies?

On the “service side” of things we try to provide you enough sets of plans (at least 15 sets) to save you from driving to a reprographics company for more copies. However, for those who want to make copies we offer reproducible vellum, or electronic PDF, or the Easy-Change pencil drawings . With these products you can make as many copies as you need – when you need them.

For more information see:
What is a reproducible vellum / original? and
What is this copyright stuff all about?
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How much does it cost to modify the plans?

We do not offer a modification service. However, you may purchase our Easy-Change PENCIL drawings then work with a local designer to make changes.

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Can I change the house and / or plans?

Yes. We encourage you to personalize you home. The plan can be changed by your builder or designer of your choice. We do not offer a modification service but our Easy-Change PENCIL drawings are very helpful. Changing the design is not a way around copyright issues. See: What is this copyright stuff all about? Extensive changes Generally, if the changes are excessive you will be better off finding a different plan that is more suitable.

Can I use the plans more than once?

Certainly. If your 15 sets of plans become tattered and torn from use, we will happily issue another 15 sets of plans, a modest re-use fee applies to cover the costs that arise from the production of new plans. (proof of purchase may be required). If your original purchase was for a reproducible set then you are all set to make your own copies.

What is a reproducible vellum / original?

“Vellum” is a special, thin paper. Plans that are printed on vellum are reproducible. We offer TWO kinds of vellum plans, INK, or PENCIL. The license is the same for both. You can make as many copies as you need anytime you need them.

  1. INK reproducible plans are printed on a vellum paper. Sometimes called “vellum” or “original,” the names are used interchangeably but refer to the same product.
  2. PENCIL reproducible plans are similar to ink reproducibles except that the plans are drawn in erasable pencil. This option is great if you think you will make changes. Simply erase and make changes!

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Can you draw plans to remodel our home?

No. Remodeling a home requires on-site measuring and visitation. It should be done by a local designer. Furthermore, we would not work from another person’s plans or dimensions.

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We want a new house. What do we do first?

Before buying a house plan, (i) Purchase, or at least secure, your building site. (ii) Determine the buildable area of the lot by subtracting building setbacks from each property line. (iii) Find a house plan that will fit inside the buildable area.

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What can we do to have low heating and cooling bills?

All Wyatt house plans are energy efficient – if they are built and insulated correctly. If you want your new home to have really low utility bills there are several construction methods that can qualify your new home for a special energy efficient mortgage. Your local banks may offer energy efficient mortgages. However, they seldom mention them so you’ll have to ask.

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Is a materials list available?

NO. We do not offer materials lists at this time.
Do the plans include mechanical details?They are not included. Building codes, and HVAC (heating & cooling) needs vary from region to region as well as the location of underground utility services. Local contractors can assist your mechanical needs.

Can I drive by the house to see it in person?

Sorry, we do not release the address of any home site. This is to protect the privacy of the current owners. We make every effort to provide numerous professional-grade, interior and exterior photographs, and provide artist illustrations and computer models available on the website. If you’d like to receive news of any updates, become a part of our social networking group.

What is your best plan and why?

The best plan depends on the needs (and opinion) of the individual. Although we offer a variety of plans, each plan has its own unique features.

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What is your return policy?

The plans are purchased specifically for your order and due to the nature of the product, house plans may not be returned for credit and/or refund under any circumstances. Please double-check your selection before ordering.

What sort of warrantee comes with the plans?

Wyatt does not warrant the suitability of the plans’ use at purchaser’s site, application or in any manner whatsoever and disclaims all other warranties, expressed or implied, including merchantability or fitness of purpose. Wyatt is not liable for special, consequential, incidental, or indirect damages of any kind, including, but not limited to, loss of anticipated profits, business opportunity or other economic loss arising from the use of services or plans received from Wyatt. Wyatt does not authorize the use of plans without the purchaser assuming all responsibility to verify dimensions and product availability prior to construction and purchaser’s obligation and agreement to strictly comply with all state and local building codes, building inspections, and the obligation of obtaining any and all building permits. Use of the plans should not be undertaken without the assistance of a construction professional. Wyatt does not guarantee the availability of any materials or products suggested or specified in the plans. In the event that any liability is imposed on Wyatt Drafting & Design, Inc. the liability to you or any third party shall not exceed the price paid for Wyatt’s product or products.

The contract protects the builder, will it protect us?

Sounds like you have a builder who believes in a detailed contract. That’s a sign he is thorough. As with any legal document, and to make sure you are protected, consult an attorney.

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Do you travel and design homes for people out of town?

That’s hard to pass up – if you are near a great vacation spot! Unfortunately, considering of hotel accommodations, air fare, plus other traveling expenses your money is better spent hiring a local designer.

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Do the plans show framing dimensions or finished dimensions?

Our house plans are dimensioned with framing dimensions.

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Is there a difference between framing and finished dimensions?

Framing dimensions are used by the people building your house literally during the “framing stages.” This is a period of time where the builders are installing the unfinished studs and “framing dimensions” measure to the unfinished stud. In other words, framing dimensions do NOT include the thickness of drywall or trim work. On the other hand, finished dimensions typically include drywall but still do not trim work.

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We can’t find the house we like. What do we do?

If you find a plan that is close to your needs but needs some adjustments we offer Easy-Change (erasable PENCIL) drawings. These are reproducible plans that you can modify then copy as many times as needed. Simply take your purchase to a local designer and have them make the changes. There’s also a chance your builder can make the changes for you. Sometimes, what you may think is a major change, is really quite easy. For example, if you like the interior but not the exterior, it is usually very easy for an experienced designer to give it a new look. We do not offer design modifications.

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Should I be my own general contractor?

Being a general contractor takes an incredible amount of time. Many people put a real value on someone else doing all the worrying and getting the headaches. If you hire a general contractor you can spend all your time doing the fun things like picking out the trim, flooring, paint, doors, siding, roofing, cabinets, lighting and so on. That alone is quite an undertaking. Ultimately, selecting a general contractor or being your own is your decision. Our plans are sold with this in mind but we have found the best homes are built by professionals who work in the trade every day. The things you may not know, and need to figure out – an experienced contractor already knows. Their experience, together with their team of professionals, makes them efficient and worth their fee. They already know where to find products at the best prices and which subcontractors do the best work for the money. A contractor takes a lot of responsibility over your home. They can keep things on schedule (less acts of God). They are insured against loss of materials on your jobsite through severe weather and theft. And new construction is typically covered by a contractor’s warranty for a full year after completion. Those things offer peace of mind. If you seriously are entertaining the thought of being your own general contractor, consider the following when evaluating your abilities:

  1. The most common reason people consider being their own general contractor is to save money. The lost wages, sleep, and hours consumed by meeting and scheduling subs adds up quickly. You are likely to find “saving money” comes at a price.
  2. Anyone who decides to be their own general takes on the responsibilities of building, pricing, scheduling, obtaining permits and surveys, engineering, and complying with building codes.
  3. Building codes vary from state to state, even from county to county. The contractor is responsible for complying with building codes. Will you be able to comply with the codes in your area?
  4. If materials are cut wrong or installed incorrectly, requiring replacement, you will lose money that you were trying to save.
  5. Some products carry warranties but if not installed correctly the warranty may be void.
  6. You must carry insurance in case someone you hire gets hurt or loses a limb while working on or traveling to or from your jobsite.
  7. Do you know enough sub-contractors? Which are reputable?
  8. If you don’t schedule well and don’t have the right materials on site when needed you might end up paying someone to stand around until the materials do arrive.
  9. Discounts? Unless you build several homes a year you may not be able to convince suppliers to give you the contractor discounts some builders get.
  10. Subcontractors may not show up when you had planned. They will probably give better service to, and remain loyal to, the contractor who gives them regular work and a regular pay check. Why not, they don’t know you or how often you’ll pay them. You might be able to pay them at the end of each day to keep them on the job but you’ll still find yourself competing with their regular contractor. If Mr. Big Contractor calls when the sub is about to start your project you might be looking for another sub.
  11. Have you seen the latest and greatest building products? Do you have time to check out the trade shows and building conventions? Builders receive new product information from company reps and by mail.
  12. Hiring someone else to do all the work takes an incredible amount of time. Having worked directly with several builders to design their personal homes, a recent builder put it this way, and don’t forget, he is in the building business and has all the contacts and subcontractors he needs, but he said, “Building this house has become a full time job.”

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Is this house plan energy efficient? All Wyatt house plans are energy efficient – if they are built and insulated correctly. We also advocate various framing methods and things like energyheel roof designs and air-lock attic accesses for maximum insulation.

Can you draw remodel plans for our existing house? No. Remodeling a home requires on-site measuring and visitation. It should be done by a local designer. Furthermore, we would not work from another person’s plans or dimensions.

Can I have the house flipped so the garage is on the opposite side? Yes. Any of the Wyatt plans can be reversed. All numbers and text will be modified and arranged to remain legible. The process may delay some orders.

What is included in a set of plans? Wyatt house plans include about twice as much detail as the average set of plans. Rather than the typical 6 to 8 pages, many of our plans exceed 20 pages.

  1. Exterior Elevations
  2. Notes, including a complete square footage breakdown and details
  3. Dimensioned Elevations
  4. Foundation
  5. Foundation Details
  6. Separate Basement Details (as needed)
  7. Main Floor
  8. Second Floor (for two story homes)
  9. Roof Plans, typically including rafter or truss notes
  10. Cross Section A
  11. Cross Section B (if needed)
  12. Interior Elevations (primary rooms)
  13. Interior Elevations for custom built-ins
  14. Kitchen Cabinet Details and/ or Elevations
  15. Fireplace Design for Mantles and Surrounds (when applicable)
  16. Bookcase Elevations and Details (when applicable)
  17. Bathroom Cabinet Details and/ or Elevations
  18. Flooring Details (when/ where applicable)
  19. Specialized Custom features built-ins or trim work (when applicable)
  20. Patio Layout Plans (when applicable)
  21. Electrical Placement